Member Churches

Our World Wide Church Family

The World Methodist Council is made up of  80 Methodist, Wesleyan and related Uniting and United Churches representing over 80.5 million people in 133 countries. To find a member church in your area please use the A-to-Z guide located below. To view a member church’s contact details, click the blue arrow button. * denotes churches under the Central and South Europe Central Conference of the United Methodist Church ** denotes churches under the Northern Europe Central Conference of the United Methodist Church

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Photo of Nepal Methodist Church

Nepal Methodist Church

Contact: Rev. Ratna Prasad ChapagainOther P.O. Box 2079 Kathmandu NepalWork Phone: 977 01 211 0326
Photo of New Zealand, Methodist Church

New Zealand, Methodist Church

Organized Methodism in Australia, as part of the Foreign Missions under the direction of the British Conference, dates from the appointment of the Rev. Samuel Leigh to New South Wales in 1815. This, Australia, New Zealand and Fiji were constituted “The Australian Wesleyan Methodist Connexion” with an Annual Conference, affiliated to the Parent English Conference, and the first conference was held in Sydney in the year 1855.…Read More
General SecretaryContact: Rev. David BushOther Methodist Connexional Office PO Box 931 Otautah/Christchurch 8140 New ZealandWork Phone: 64 3 366 6049Work Fax: 64 3 358 7146

Organized Methodism in Australia, as part of the Foreign Missions under the direction of the British Conference, dates from the appointment of the Rev. Samuel Leigh to New South Wales in 1815. This, Australia, New Zealand and Fiji were constituted “The Australian Wesleyan Methodist Connexion” with an Annual Conference, affiliated to the Parent English Conference, and the first conference was held in Sydney in the year 1855. The New Zealand Church separated from the Australian Conference in 1913 with the union of the Methodist Church of New Zealand and the Primitive Methodist Church of New Zealand and the first conference was held in that year.
New Zealand is a country with a population of 3,500,000. There are 9,473 Methodist Church members who worship as part of a Methodist Church parish. In addition there is a significant number of Methodist Church members who worship within a cooperative venture where the Methodist Church has combined with the Presbyterian or Anglicans or Church of Christ or Congregational Union congregation of a particular area. The establishment of cooperative ventures has occurred in many regions of the country and particularly in rural areas. These form over half of the parishes for which the Methodist Church of New Zealand is responsible.
At the annual conference in 1983 the church made a conscious decision to work toward becoming a bicultural church. In particular the church made a decision to take seriously the founding document of our nation, the Treaty of Waitangi. The treaty was signed by Maori and Pakeha, and the church’s commitment to the bicultural journey affirms that partnership. For this reason we have adopted practices whereby the voice of the Tangata Whenua (the original people) is heard as equal with the voice of the Tauiwi (the people who came after). One of the outcomes of this recognition of partnership is that our church now seeks to make decisions using as much as possible a consensus process of decision-making.
At the 1989 conference, the following statement of mission was adopted for the people of Aotearoa/New Zealand who are associated with the Methodist tradition, both in Methodist parishes and in cooperative ventures. “Our church’s mission in Aotearoa/New Zealand is to reflect and proclaim the transforming love of God as revealed in Jesus Christ and declared in the scriptures. We are empowered by the Holy Spirit to serve God in the world. The Treaty of Waitangi is the covenant establishing our nation on the basis of power-sharing partnership and will guide how we undertake mission.”
The mission statement becomes the basis on which the mission of the Methodist Church of New Zealand, Te haahi Weteriana o Aotearoa is carried out, and reflects the partnership we seek to embody.

Photo of New Zealand, Wesleyan Methodist Church

New Zealand, Wesleyan Methodist Church

The Wesleyan Methodist Church of New Zealand (WMCNZ) is a dynamic, evangelical expression of Methodism in the South Pacific, living out Wesley’s core gospel convictions in the multicultural, secular context of wider New Zealand society. The first Wesleyan Methodist minister to come to the South Pacific in 1815 was Rev. Samuel Leigh, from England. He visited New Zealand for nine months during 1819.…Read More
Contact: Rev. Dr. Richard WaughOther National Resource Centre PO Box 82-363 Highland Park Auckland 2143 New ZealandWork National Resource Centre 219 Burswood Drive Auckland 2013 New ZealandWork Phone: 64 9 271 6460

The Wesleyan Methodist Church of New Zealand (WMCNZ) is a dynamic, evangelical expression of Methodism in the South Pacific, living out Wesley’s core gospel convictions in the multicultural, secular context of wider New Zealand society. The first Wesleyan Methodist minister to come to the South Pacific in 1815 was Rev. Samuel Leigh, from England. He visited New Zealand for nine months during 1819. With the support of the new (British) Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society, Leigh established the first New Zealand Wesleyan work at Whangaroa (near Kaeo) in 1823. The Wesleydale mission was unsuccessful but was re-established at Mangungu in the Hokianga. Wesleyan missionaries, along with Anglicans, were instrumental in supporting the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi; between the indigenous Maori people and the British Crown. Other branches of British Methodism established themselves in New Zealand; in 1844 the Primitive Methodists, in 1860 the United Free Methodists and in 1877 the Bible Christians. These churches, and the main Wesleyan Methodist Church, were all evangelical in theology. Through a series of church unions, all the different Methodist churches in New Zealand had combined by 1913. During the 1930s and after World War II, the Methodist Church progressively adopted a more intellectual style of ministry training, which included a critical Biblical teaching method, pastoral counselling emphases, and a reduced focus on holiness and evangelical/mission convictions. Pacifism, ecumenism, post-war social turmoil, and an increasingly liberal theological ethos became influential in the church. Many evangelical ministers and lay people were concerned at the pluralism of theology, loss of Wesleyan theological distinctives, and from the 1980s the over-riding bicultural criteria which became the benchmark of mission and decision-making. The rise of the charismatic movement in the 1970s and 1980s saw many Methodists join other denominations. Theological disquiet for evangelicals deepened when the 1997 Methodist Conference approved a homosexual minister into full connexion, and in the process contravened proper decision-making processes. The Wesleyan Methodist Movement was formed to co-ordinate the work of evangelicals who could not live in theological conscience with the 1997 Methodist Conference decision. In July 2000 the Wesleyan Methodist Church of New Zealand (WMCNZ) was formed as a multi-cultural church in the Wesleyan stream to pursue a renewed evangelical missional future. The WMCNZ was founded as an indigenous church with New Zealand leadership, led by founding National Superintendent Rev Edgar Hornblow. Among decisions made at the first conference was to join the Wesleyan World Fellowship of the international Wesleyan Church. In September 2007 the WMCNZ was received as a full member of the World Methodist Council. In August 2012 a new South Pacific Regional Conference of the Wesleyan Methodist Church was inaugurated in Brisbane, Australia, with the constituent national conferences being those of Australia, Bougainville, New Zealand and the Solomon Islands. Rev. Dr Richard Waugh, New Zealand National Superintendent, was appointed the first President. The WMCNZ undertakes mission in an ethnically diverse New Zealand (population of 4.5m) which is now one of the most secularised English-speaking countries in the world. The WMCNZ has 23 churches (2015) and four more churches in current planning, with 60 ordained ministers, licensed ministers, and ministry students (of whom many are women, younger people and culturally diverse). A multi-cultural missional ethos is promoted. The WMCNZ is ecumenically committed, takes an active role in World Methodism, and is a member of National Church Leaders Aotearoa New Zealand, New Zealand Christian Network, and supports many other interdenominational organisations. In conjunction with the Church of the Nazarene and the Salvation Army the WMCNZ sponsors an annual Wesleyan theological symposium.

Photo of Nigeria, Methodist Church

Nigeria, Methodist Church

The boundaries of Nigeria were fixed towards the end of the 19th century during the partition of Africa. Its immediate neighbors are Cameroun to the East, Chad to the Northeast, Niger to the North and Northwest and the Republic of Benin to the West. The entire South is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean. The population is estimated at over 100 million.…Read More
Contact: His Eminence Dr Samuel Chukwuemeka Kanu Uche, JPOther 21/22 Marina P.O. Box 2011 Lagos 101001 NigeriaWork Phone: 234 1 270 2711Work Fax: 234 1 264 6907

The boundaries of Nigeria were fixed towards the end of the 19th century during the partition of Africa. Its immediate neighbors are Cameroun to the East, Chad to the Northeast, Niger to the North and Northwest and the Republic of Benin to the West. The entire South is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean.
The population is estimated at over 100 million. It is inhabited by people of various ethnic groups like Hausa, the Edo, the Ibo, the Yoruba, the Efik, Ibibio, the Kanuri and many others. The peoples’ religion is either Christianity, Islam or traditional religions.
Christianity, as it now exists in Nigeria, was established with the arrival of Thomas Birch Freeman in the country. On September 24, 1842, Thomas Birch Freeman, a Wesley Methodist Church Missionary, with two devoted helpers, William DeGraft and Mrs. DeGraft, landed in Badagry. They had come to Nigeria in response to the request for missionaries by the liberated people who had returned to Abeokuta from Sierra Leone and another request by James Ferguson, an ex-slave who had settled in Badagry. From the mission stations established in Badagry and Abeokuta, the Methodist Church spread to various parts of the country West of the River Niger and part of the North.
In 1893, the Revs. Fairley and Ben Showell, missionaries of the Primitive Methodist Church, arrived in Archibong Town from Fernando Po, an Island off the southern coast of Nigeria. From Archibong Town, the Methodist Church spread to various parts of the country, east of the River Niger and crossed to parts of the North. The church west of the River Niger and part of the North was known as the Western Nigeria District and east of the Niger and another part of the North was known as the Eastern Nigeria District. Both existed independently of each other until 1962 when they constituted the Conference of Methodist Church Nigeria. The conference is composed of seven districts – Lagos, Ibadan, Ilesa, Umuahia, Port-Harcourt, Calabar and the North. The church has continued to spread into new areas, established an Outreach/Evangelism Department and appointed a Director of Evangelism.
An Episcopal system adopted in 1976 was not fully accepted by all sections of the church until the two sides came together and resolved to end the disagreement. The two sides fashioned a new constitution which was ratified on May 24, 1990. The system is still Episcopal but the points which caused discontent were amended to be acceptable to both sides.
Methodist Church Nigeria now has 36 dioceses in contrast to its 7 districts in 1962. In addition to its concern for the spiritual life of the people in Nigeria, it also takes part in the social and economic welfare of the people. All its secular schools, like those of other denominations, have been taken over by the government. However, new schools are being established in addition to paying greater attention to Sunday Schools and chaplaincy services in public schools and other establishments. The decision to establish a Methodist University was taken recently. The church runs centers for the lepers at Uzuakoli and the mentally ill at Emudo Itumbauzo in Abia State, to mention a few. It also runs a model farm at Kaiama in Niger State.
Methodist Church Nigeria is headed by the Prelate, who is the head of the church and who presides over conference, the overall governing body of the church, which meets every two years to deliberate and take decision on all issues affecting the life of the church.
Presbyters with assistance of other ministers, administer the circuits and local congregations.

Photo of Nigeria, United Methodist Church

Nigeria, United Methodist Church

The Nigeria Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church, separated into two halves by the River Benue, is located in the Northeastern part of Nigeria. It attained Conference status in 1992 and has its own resident bishop. The headquarters is in Jalingo, capital of the new Tabara State of Nigeria. The first foundation for mission in Muri was laid in September, 1906, when the Reverend Dr.…Read More
Contact: Bishop Arthur R. KulahOther UMCN Secretariat, Mile Six Jalingo – Numan Road PO Box 148 Jalingo Taraba State NigeriaWork Phone: 234 806 347 5207Work Fax: 234 708 656 9911

The Nigeria Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church, separated into two halves by the River Benue, is located in the Northeastern part of Nigeria. It attained Conference status in 1992 and has its own resident bishop. The headquarters is in Jalingo, capital of the new Tabara State of Nigeria.
The first foundation for mission in Muri was laid in September, 1906, when the Reverend Dr. C. W. Guinter of the Evangelical church, a forerunner of the Evangelical United Brethren (EUB) traveled up the Benue River to Ibi near Wukari. Guinter had come from the United States with four other missionaries to work for Jesus Christ in the Sudan – a region extending across Northern Africa, south of the Sahara.
In 1946, the Evangelical church became part of the newly merged Evangelical United Brethren (EUB). Mean while, the British Methodists were having trouble in staffing and financing their mission work in Nigeria while still recovering from World War II. So in 1947, the British missions on the southern side of the Benue River were merged with those of the EUB on the northern side.
From 1923 until 1954, the EUB Church in Nigeria had been run by the Missionary Council. In 1954, it became the Muri Regional Church Council. The foreign missionaries were brought under the same Church Council as the indigenous Nigerians.
In 1954, the first indigenous leaders were elected. After pastoral training, the first ordinations of Nigerians took place in 1958 and 1964. Four district churches were also created in 1964, two on each side of the river. Today there are 15 districts and 180 charges.
At the United Methodist General Conference it was resolved that the Evangelical United Brethren Church in Nigeria would become part of the West African Central Conference as “Muri Provisional Annual Conference.”
Bishop Arthur F. Kulah of the Liberia Annual Conference was appointed as Itinerant Bishop to Nigeria from 1984 to 1988. In 1989, he was replaced by Bishop Thomas S. Bangura of the Sierra Leone Annual Conference. Finally, in May 1992, Nigeria became a full Annual Conference, and on August 14, Dr. Done Peter Dabale was elected as its first Resident Bishop.
In 1989, the church established its theological seminary at Banyam to prepare students for ministerial work and degree programs at other theological seminaries. The Kakulu Bible Institute in Zing and the Didango Bible School met our demands of evangelists.
An evangelical program in our Church is at work establishing new churches and directing annual workshops and courses for the clergy and evangelists.
The church sponsors programs in agriculture, rural health, rural development, women’s work, youth and aviation. We have been able to work harmoniously both at home and abroad for the success of church growth and development in Nigeria.

Photo of North Africa, United Methodist Church *

North Africa, United Methodist Church *

The work of Methodism in North Africa was started in 1908 by missionaries from the USA. Before Algeria became independent in 1962, there were no restrictions on church work in this country. Open evangelization was allowed. The Methodist Church owned church buildings, children's homes and clinics. At that time, the Church in Northern Africa was organized as an annual conference, to which local pastors, lay preachers, and evangelists belonged.…Read More
Contact: Rev. Daniel NussbaumerHome 47, rue des Vergers Mulhouse FR-68100 FranceWork Phone: 33 389 42 29 00

The work of Methodism in North Africa was started in 1908 by missionaries from the USA. Before Algeria became independent in 1962, there were no restrictions on church work in this country. Open evangelization was allowed. The Methodist Church owned church buildings, children’s homes and clinics. At that time, the Church in Northern Africa was organized as an annual conference, to which local pastors, lay preachers, and evangelists belonged. Then the country dissolved its ties to France. This was a historic juncture that had serious – and for many, painful – consequences. Many local Christians left the country, believing that there was no place for a Christian Church in an independent Algeria. Finally, eight years later, events followed which were to define the next period: half of the Methodist missionaries were deported, children’s homes and boarding schools were forced to close, and Church property was taken over by the state.
In 1972, the Methodist Church fused with most of the other Protestant denominations to form the Protestant Church of Algeria, and Methodist work in Northern Africa was reorganized as a district of the annual conference of Switzerland/France. This work also includes the cooperation of various churches in Tunis, Tunisia, with its emphasis on social services (delivering food, clothing and medicines), on assistance for immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa, and on the organization of ecumenical worship services and university Bible groups.
Today, the Christian Church is a tiny minority in Algeria, where Islam is now the state religion. Fairly recently, it was possible to run a congregation in an organized manner, in spite of state-ordered limitations (prohibition of public evangelization, prohibition of all activities not directly related to church work, prohibition of all services to Moslem children, youth and students). The political and religious developments of the past few years have not exactly made Methodist work any easier in this country.
However, there are worship services, Bible studies, weddings and baptisms. In Algiers and Oran, especially, these take place through ecumenical cooperation. More and more people are expressing their interest in the Christian faith. Through the social services supported by the UMC in Switzerland, a sewing school for deaf women in Constantine is run, which means that some young women are receiving a chance for a better future.
The training of local staff is a major priority of Church life today, because although leaders in the Methodist congregations in Algeria continue to maintain existing relations, they also hope to increase the level of local responsibility.
Structurally, the Protestant Church of Algeria is now constituted as a federation of Protestant congregations, in which Methodist personalities continue to carry out important leadership functions. However, this has no effect on the cooperation in personnel and financial matters between the Methodist congregations in Algeria and the Annual Conference in of Switzerland/France.

Photo of North Katanga United Methodist Church

North Katanga United Methodist Church

Contact: Bishop Nkulu NtamboOther PO Box 22037 Kitwe ZambiaWork Phone: 243 81 408 1120Work Fax: 243 97 108 9792
Photo of Northern Europe Central Conference **

Northern Europe Central Conference **

The Northern Europe Central Conference is devided into two Episcopal Areas: The Nordic and Baltic Episcopal area consisting of the United Methodist Churches in Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Sweden, and the Eurasia Episcopal Area consisting of United Methodist Churches in Russia, Ukraine and Moldova, and Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgystan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan). Information on each church is listed separately by country.Read More
Contact: Bishop Christian AlstedOther Nordic and Baltic Episcopal Area of the United Methodist Church Rigensgade 21 A, P. B. 2092 Copenhagen K DK-1316 DenmarkWork Phone: 45 7020 9390Work Fax: 47 23 33 27 36

The Northern Europe Central Conference is devided into two Episcopal Areas: The Nordic and Baltic Episcopal area consisting of the United Methodist Churches in Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Sweden, and the Eurasia Episcopal Area consisting of United Methodist Churches in Russia, Ukraine and Moldova, and Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgystan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan). Information on each church is listed separately by country.

Photo of Northern Europe Central Conference **

Northern Europe Central Conference **

Contact: Jørgen ThaarupOther Eurasia Episcopal Area Khamovnicheskiy val 24, stroenie 2 Moscow 119 048 RussiaWork Phone: 7 499 242 1774Work Fax: 7 499 242 1774
Photo of Norway, United Methodist Church **

Norway, United Methodist Church **

In Norway, the story of Methodism began with seaman Ole Peter Petersen’s preaching in 1849 and the years ahead. In 1851, O.P. Petersen established the Norwegian-Danish Methodist Church in America. In 1856, Danish-American Christian Willerup was sent to Scandinavia as a superintendent in order to lead the church, which had emerged spontaneously. The first Methodist church was founded during the same year, thereby making the establishment of the Methodist Church in Norway a reality.…Read More
District SuperintendentsContact: Revs. Svein J. Veland, Steinar Hjerpseth, and Rev. Øyvind HelliesenOther Postboks 2744 St. Hanshaugen Oslo N-0131 NorwayWork Phone: 47 23 33 27 00Work Fax: 47 23 33 27 01

In Norway, the story of Methodism began with seaman Ole Peter Petersen’s preaching in 1849 and the years ahead. In 1851, O.P. Petersen established the Norwegian-Danish Methodist Church in America. In 1856, Danish-American Christian Willerup was sent to Scandinavia as a superintendent in order to lead the church, which had emerged spontaneously. The first Methodist church was founded during the same year, thereby making the establishment of the Methodist Church in Norway a reality. In 1876 the church in Norway received status as an Annual Conference. There were 29 pastors, 19 congregations and 2,798 members, and the conference got its own superintendent, Martin Hansen.
The membership number has been declining for the last 50 years. The Annual Conference Council has therefore prioritized and recommended tools like Natural Church Development, Alpha and Walk to Emmaus in order to try to turn this development.