Member Churches

Our World Wide Church Family

The World Methodist Council is made up of  80 Methodist, Wesleyan and related Uniting and United Churches representing over 80.5 million people in 133 countries. To find a member church in your area please use the A-to-Z guide located below. To view a member church’s contact details, click the blue arrow button. * denotes churches under the Central and South Europe Central Conference of the United Methodist Church ** denotes churches under the Northern Europe Central Conference of the United Methodist Church

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U W Z
Photo of Kenya, Methodist Church

Kenya, Methodist Church

The Methodist Church in Kenya was planted in 1862 at Ribe. The church continued to grow and spread to other parts in the country. The church became autonomous in January 1967 and since then has engaged in evangelism and outreach. Currently the church has mission outreach in Uganda and Tanzania. The church is divided into eight synods, namely, Singwaya, Pwani, Nairobi, Western Kenya, Nyambene, Miathene, Kaaga and Nkubu.…Read More
Contact: Rev. Dr. Stephen Kanyaru M’ImpwiiAddress P.O. Box 47633 – 00100 Nairobi 100 KenyaWork Phone: 254 20 240 3437Work Fax: 254 20 240 3438

The Methodist Church in Kenya was planted in 1862 at Ribe. The church continued to grow and spread to other parts in the country. The church became autonomous in January 1967 and since then has engaged in evangelism and outreach. Currently the church has mission outreach in Uganda and Tanzania.
The church is divided into eight synods, namely, Singwaya, Pwani, Nairobi, Western Kenya, Nyambene, Miathene, Kaaga and Nkubu. Each synod has a bishop who presides over the synod while there is a connexional presiding bishop.
Our mission has continued to grow in scope. We are sponsors of other 200 schools, a hospital and many dispensaries. We also have agricultural training institutes, youth polytechnic, technical schools, special schools for the physically disabled and vocational schools. Our ecumenical cooperation has enabled us to have a united Theological College at Limuru. We also have Lavington United Church which is sponsored by the Methodists.
The church now has 205 ministers, 1,000 congregations with 300,000 members and a Methodist community of 800,000. We anticipate doubling our membership in the next five years. We have opened a Kenya Methodist University that will spearhead university education in our region. We have other programmes such as rural development programmes, community health, youth, women fellowship AIDs, lay training and family education. We are members of the All Africa Conference of Churches, National Council of Churches of Kenya, World Council of Churches and other fraternal bodies in the region.

Photo of Korea, Methodist Church

Korea, Methodist Church

God, who precedes all human planning, so loved this calm land of the East that he sent a number of mission pioneers to proclaim the Gospel of salvation in Jesus Christ. They were filled with the passion for saving the soul of Korean people and the Korean society. The first Methodist missionary was R. S. Maclay, of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Japan.…Read More
Contact: Bishop Ki-Taek KimAddress 16th Methodist Center Taepyungro-1ga Jung-gu 100-101 South KoreaWork Phone: 82 2 399 4361Work Fax: 82 2 399 4307

God, who precedes all human planning, so loved this calm land of the East that he sent a number of mission pioneers to proclaim the Gospel of salvation in Jesus Christ. They were filled with the passion for saving the soul of Korean people and the Korean society. The first Methodist missionary was R. S. Maclay, of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Japan. He visited Korea on 24 June 1884 and obtained permission from King Kojong to do God‟s work in the field of „education and medical treatment‟. On Easter Sunday, April 5, 1885, Rev. H. G. Appenzeller, with H. G. Underwood, a Presbyterian missionary, arrived in Korea to “bring the Korean people to the light and liberty of God‟s children.” One month later W. B. Scranton, another American missionary, came to Korea with his mother, Mrs. Scranton. Soon H. G. Appenzeller and Mrs. W.P. Scranton founded schools and hospitals. In October 1895 the Methodist Episcopal Church South also began missionary work. Bishop E. R. Hendrix and Dr. C. F. Reid who had been working in China, entered Korea by the efforts of a Korean scholar, Yoon, Chi-Ho who became the first member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South during his stay in China. The Southern Methodist Church was especially interested in missionary work for women and sent Mrs. Campbell to Korea two years later.
From the beginning the Methodist Church made a great contribution to the development and modernization of Korean society by its active involvement in education, medical treatment and publication. A revival movement which occurred in Wonsan in 1903 and another in Pyongyang in 1907 became milestones of the explosive growth of the church. In 1930 the Methodist Episcopal Church North and the Methodist Episcopal Church South were united for form the independent Korean Methodist Church.
After World War II, the Korean Church was divided for a few years, but reunited in 1949. During the Korean War beginning in 1950, the Korean Church went through hardships with church leaders being kidnapped or executed and many church buildings destroyed. Since that time, the Korean Methodist Church has grown rapidly with a spiritual passion for lost souls of the Korean people. It has also promoted social reformation, human rights and mission work among urban laborers and farmers.
The Korean Methodist Church is committed to the task of evangelism and the realization of peace and justice in the world, and sends missionaries to other countries to share the Gospel. In the Korean Methodist Church there are 5,692 Churches, 8,415 ministers, and 1,508,430 members.